Prohibit Bear Hounding in Wisconsin’s National Forests–Please sign the petition

Many know that the Bear is also sacred to many Native American’s and one of our relatives. Protect The Wolves™ has also been actively speaking out against bear hounding for years. Bear hounding is one of the most abhorrent things done to animals and still legal in the state of Wisconsin. Wisconsin also allows the hounding of one species or another 24/7/365 either as “training” or as a form of “hunting.”

Wisconsin’s public lands should be safe for visitors and the wildlife that lives there. Bear “hounding” (the use of packs of dogs to run pursue wildlife) renders these wild places inhospitable for people and deadly to wild animals. The U.S. Forest Service (USFS) should immediately prohibit the running of hounds in Chequamegon-Nicolet National Forests.

The Chequamegon-Nicolet National Forest covers more than 1.5 million acres of Wisconsin’s pristine, iconic Northwoods. Every year, bear hounders converge on these and other woodland areas, turning their packs of dogs loose to pursue and terrorize native wildlife.

These packs of pursuing off-leash dogs threaten the life of wolf pups and adult wolves and virtually every land animal in their path. These public lands are rendered inhospitable for weeks every year during bear hounding season.

Please ask the Chequamegon-Nicolet National Forest to prohibit “hounding” on these National Forest Service lands.

https://petitions.moveon.org/sign/prohibit-bear-hounding?source=c.url&r_by=11087978

We also know that wolves,  just like other Canidae are territorial so the dogs are sometimes killed because of these despicable hunters that put them there. But the hunters don’t even give a damn or they would not be using and abusing the dogs. Mind you, they also get a good amount of cash when the hounds are killed. They call it a”fun” sport. There is no doubt that they are some of the worst psychopaths along with other trophy hunters on the planet! ~ L.G 

No land for carnivores: Animals that occupied 96% of the planet are struggling for survival

This is a great article about what has happened over time to our planets most endangered and essential carnivores. It includes maps of current and former ranges of many imperiled species and why we could lose many to extinction.  I believe if there are enough people that actually care and take action we can #StopExtinction before it is too late #ExtinctionIsForever ~L.G

Critically endangered Red Wolf 

These threats pose a risk of extinction for carnivores, as entire populations can get wiped out from particular areas and reduce the ranges up to which they can be found (a species range is the geographical area where a particular species can be found during its lifetime). But due to a lack of knowledge about the extent to which former ranges have contracted due to threats, there is poor understanding of the environmental effects that a loss of these ranges have on large carnivores.

Some studies have estimated as many as 170 animals have lost over 50% of their former ranges, mainly due to an increase in human densities or other human impacts – but researchers are yet to determine a global estimate of how much carnivore ranges have contracted in the world.

Threatened with extinction

A recent study conducted by researchers from Oregon State University in the US addresses this gap by presenting the first global analysis of the extent of ranges large carnivores have lost.

To arrive at their analysis, the researchers used current range maps shared by the International Union for Conservation of Nature Red List for 24 of the 25 large carnivores of the world. Former ranges were compared to what they might have been around 1500 AD.

Range contraction maps for 25 large carnivores. Regions of persistence (i.e. inside both historic and current ranges) are shown in yellow-orange, while regions of contraction (inside historic but not current range) are shown in dark red. Species are ordered by percentage range contraction with the greatest contractions shown in the uppermost panels.
Range contraction maps for 25 large carnivores. Regions of persistence (i.e. inside both historic and current ranges) are shown in yellow-orange, while regions of contraction (inside historic but not current range) are shown in dark red. Species are ordered by percentage range contraction with the greatest contractions shown in the uppermost panels.

The researchers found that the carnivores that have suffered the greatest loss of habitats are the red wolf, the Ethiopian wolf, tigers, lions, African wild dogs and cheetahs. These animals have lost between 92% to 99% of their original habitat. Christopher Wolf, a doctoral student at the University and the lead author of the study said: “All six of these species are now threatened with extinction and their numbers are decreasing.”

On the other hand the Eurasian lynx, the dingo, the grey wolf and spotted, striped and brown hyenas have experienced a lower loss of habitat, between 12% to 27%.

A large number of carnivores were once found in the forests of South and Southeast Asia, with up to nine species occurring together, while in Africa as many as six large carnivore species were known to occur together. India is still considered a global biodiversity hotspot and is home to lesser known carnivores like the clouded leopard, the Asiatic wild dog, the striped hyena and black and brown bears. But this also means that Southeast Asia and Africa are where the greatest variety of large carnivores have faced a decline. Oceania (Australia and its neighbouring countries), Europe and the Americas, which had a smaller variety of carnivores, have experienced carnivore loss at a higher percentage due to the similarity in their terrain (in fact, these areas have lost all of their large carnivores).

Composite range contractions maps based on all 25 large carnivores. Variables shown are (a) historic species richness, (b) current species richness, (c) their difference (i.e. lost species richness) and (d) the percentage of species lost.
Composite range contractions maps based on all 25 large carnivores. Variables shown are (a) historic species richness, (b) current species richness, (c) their difference (i.e. lost species richness) and (d) the percentage of species lost.

Historically, large carnivores were found on 96 per cent of the Earth’s land, except for islands like Madagascar and Papua New Guinea. Large carnivores can now be found only on 34% of the planet’s land. Species that occur in India, like the tiger, have lost nearly 95% of their former range, the snow leopard has lost 77% of its range and the clouded leopard has lost 63%.

Wolf said, “The key drivers of these range contractions include increasing human population densities and habitat loss due to agriculture and livestock.”

Being grass eating animals, livestock like cattle compete with wild herbivores for food. An increase in livestock numbers can potentially decrease number of wild prey thus reducing the naturally preferred prey of carnivores. This brings carnivores in contact with humans, as they take to killing domestic livestock. Real or imaginary threats to livestock cause humans to retaliate against carnivores. Similarly, researchers found that a conversion of suitable habitat for carnivores to agricultural farms also leads to reduction in range grounds, leaving no natural habitats for them to breed and hunt.

Remarkably, the same factors that lead to a decrease in carnivore numbers can also protect them, depending on the levels of human tolerance and government policies, as well as the animal’s ability to subsist. For instance, Ahmednagar district in Western Maharashtra, which is dominated by cropland and livestock supports leopards and hyenas. But such cases where humans are tolerant of carnivores are exceptions rather than the norm.

Regions of the world with intact or no longer intact large carnivore guilds (one or more species). Note that regions with high historic large carnivore richness (like Southeast Asia) seldom have intact guilds. Altogether, intact guilds make up 34% of the world’s land area while 96% of land (excluding Antarctica) once contained one or more large carnivores.
Regions of the world with intact or no longer intact large carnivore guilds (one or more species). Note that regions with high historic large carnivore richness (like Southeast Asia) seldom have intact guilds. Altogether, intact guilds make up 34% of the world's land area while 96% of land (excluding Antarctica) once contained one or more large carnivores.

The Oregon State University’s study has a couple of limitations due to its use of old range maps. Old maps tend to take a very broad overview of areas which do not leave out pockets where species do not occur at all. Old maps also do not consider the number of individuals of a species in an area, thus they do not truly reflect the size of their populations.

However, the research is decisive as it shows the extent to which carnivores have lost their old stomping grounds. To conserve large carnivores, the authors say: “Increasing human tolerance may be the best way to save these species from extinction along with the expansion and strengthening of protected area networks, which protect all resident large carnivores along with their prey.”

The study was published in the journal Royal Society Open Science on July 12, 2017

Help Save Oregon’s Wolves From Poaching and Useless Killing! Please sign the petition

In August, the Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife (ODFW) killed two wolves. Then two more… all at the request of ranchers.

The wolf population is lower than it was in 2015 when wolves were removed from the endangered species list, and if we don’t take action now, we may not have any wolves left in Oregon.

Not only has the ODFW been bowing to the demands of the cattle industry by killing entire packs, but the new plan by ODFW includes a provision to allow for trophy hunting of wolves. To make matters worse, the agency will no longer proactively provide the public with information about wolf killings.

Despite scientists quoted in ODFW’s own plan asserting that the plan is fundamentally flawed, ODFW is still moving forward. We need to take action and stand up for wolves.

The cattle industry wants to protect livestock. But it’s just people like you and me looking out for wolves. And frankly, there are better ways to protect cattle than by killing wolves.

We need a plan that emphasizes transparency, accountability, and preventative measures – not something that allows for trophy hunting and state agencies that bow to the will of large livestock producers.

Sign the petition to ODFW demanding that they revisit their procedures for killing wolves ~ L.G 

https://www.thepetitionsite.com/takeaction/909/977/032/?TAP=1732

Help Protect Oregon Wolves

NO to Toxic Legislation to be considered Wednesday 9-13

Good morning,  We hope all have taken action by asking our elected officials to oppose all the toxic legislation to delist wolves and dismantle the Endangered Species Act. House Natural Resources Committee is taking up several bills TODAY, WED. that undermine the Endangered Species Act, prioritize politics over science, and undermine our ability to protect imperiled species in the U.S. and across the world. The bills provide a handout to polar bear trophy hunters, open up millions of acres of federal public lands to painful steel-jawed leghold traps, and strip ESA protections from wolves in the Great Lakes and Wyoming and captive foreign species in the U.S. like elephants, tigers, lions, leopards, rhinos, and chimpanzees. NO to ALL THESE BILLS  H.R. 3668, the “SHARE Act, H.R. 424  WAR ON WOLVS ACT,  H.R. 2603  H.R 3131, H.R. 1274, H.R. 717   These will delist wolves WITH NO JUDICIAL REVIEW, prohibit funds to be used by the USFWS to enforce protections for wolves in the lower 48 states, allowing hunting in our national parks.

If your U.S. Representative is on this committee (at https://naturalresources.house.gov/about/members.htm), PLEASE ASK  him or her to vote NO on all the bills being considering by the House Natural Resources Committee today! If not them PLEASE CALL U.S. Senate Minority Leader Charles E. Schumer Phone: (202) 224-6542 D.C office https://www.schumer.senate.gov/contact/email-chuck

~L.G 

#StopExtinction #SavetheESA #StandForWolves 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Photo credit and copyright~ Wolf Conservation Center 

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