WSU blows off Promised Settlement Date with Dr. Robert Wielgus

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FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE:

 

WSU blows off Promised Settlement Date with Dr. Robert Wielgus

 

For Immediate Release: December 28, 2017

Questions can be directed to:

Dr. Robert Wielgus:  Contact Info can be obtained from Protect The Wolves™

Protect The Wolves™ (530) 377-3031   [email protected]

Patricia Herman President Protect The Wolves™

Roger Dobson Director Protect The Wolves™

To Begin with WSU ‘s Dean of Agriculture, Ron Mittelhamer conspired and colluded with wdfw’s wolf policy lead Donny Marorello and Republican Representative Joel Kretz to mislead and lie to the public , the WAG, and the Washington legislature by defaming and discrediting internationally renowned predator ecologist professor Robert Wielgus of Wsu.
Wielgus reported that his legislatively funded research on wolf livestock depredations could be easily avoided in Wa by keeping livestock away from known wolf dens.
Those results were not what Dean Mittlehamer, wdfw Donny Martorello, or Representative Kretz wanted to be reported. So they destroyed the career and laboratory of WSU Professor Wielgus by charging Wielgus with 4 phony charges ( fiscal misappropriation, illegal use of state resources, illegal political lobbying, and scientific misconduct) and denouncing him as a liar and fraud.
 
  WSU has defamed Wielgus, Wielgus was subsequently exonerated of All 4 charges. Needless to say  WSU has continued targeting Wielgus . Since then his reputation and research laboratory were destroyed and his research salary was withheld and withdrawn by WSU.

All of this comes at the tail end of a 4 month wait, costing Dr. Wielgus even more undue stress and possibly losing his home. Peer initially gave them a 60-day window to review our complaint and decide how they’d like to proceed! Adam Carlesco was told that WSU would like to avoid litigation, and therefore would get back to them ASAP with an idea of a settlement agreement. Guess what People WSU’s  60-day window has passed. WSU asked for a few more days since the attorney handling the case passed away, so Peer out of compassion for their loss gave them some additional time.  Sadly WSU does not appear to care about the undue Stress, heartache, financial loss, and  all of the other drains on Dr. Wielguses health.

WSU’s new attorney got up to speed and claimed he’d get them a counter offer, but then they received nothing by the 22nd as promised which coming from an AG influenced organization isn’t a total surprise. From what Adam understands, the Assistant AG now on the case is a straight-shooter, our local counsel has worked with him and say he’s an honest and good guy – so that implies the issue is WSU and state administrators.

So, in a nutshell this puts Wielgus/ Peer in a tough spot. They have a mediation date set for early Feb, but given that they have not even received a counter offer by the promised date, they are not sure it’s going to be productive anyway. Rob is upset, as is Peer, as are We. So Peer will be filing this suit next week when local counsel gets back into the office.

Nothing should hamper or prevent negotiations while this case sits in federal court, unless WSU continues playing games with Human Lives. Peer conceivably could do both mediation and settlement, however with filing in Federal Court Next week  WSU will know that they are not playing games and hopefully they’ll straighten up since Peer knows they do not want the court precedent or continuing bad press that this case would bring. Protect The Wolves will continue to post on them and their underhanded treatment of Dr. Wielgus until he is vindicated as WSU should have done straight up from the very beginning.

Additionally, since they missed Peer’s deadline, with no remorse it would appear to a prudent individual. Peer will be working with the American Assn. of University Professors (AAUP) to draft up a resolution calling for a vote of “no-confidence” for the administrators running WSU and its Ag influenced school. Given the support the AAUP has had in its previous resolutions against the administration they believe that this could make a big difference while at the same time gather the attention of a number of higher education press outlets – the kind of media that WSU wants to avoid. Combined with the reporter from NY Times Magazine snooping around on this story, it seems that WSU is in for another, bigger black eye and Protect The Wolves™ will stick with this story to help end the Influence on a so called publicly funded Institution.

Our Children as well as their Children need to know when they choose a publicly funded school that they in fact will receive fair treatment. After all, day in and day out We all try to teach our children to be honest upstanding citizens.  It is high time that WSU’s Administrators as well as Washington States Elected Officials are held accountable.  At this point in time, with the influence placed on WSU by Kretz to Throw Wielgus under the bus, It will take  a whole lot of back peddling to get this Black eye off their Faces! Considering Joel Kretz appears to have Violated Washington State LAW. By violating this particular RCW he appears to be guilty of criminal harassment under WA law. RCW 9A.46.020.  by issuing indirect death threats against Dr. Robert Wielgus.

 

 

 Are Washington State’s wolves  on the move?

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NATIVE TO THE Olympic Mountain range — how else would there be a Grey Wolf River or the Sequim Wolves sports teams — wolves are showing an ability to range further than many previously thought.

The state Department of Fish and Wildlife has produced new maps that show the state’s grey wolf population has moved further west than officials previously thought — although it appears no wolves have reached the I-5 corridor or made any other moves in the direction of the North Olympic Peninsula.

Data is taken from GPS collars Fish and Wildlife has strapped to various breeding males and females and other pack members around the state since 2008.

More wolves haven’t been collared than have, so it wouldn’t be correct to completely rule out the possibility of wolves venturing deeper into Western Washington.

The maps represent “the most complete dataset currently available of wolf telemetry in Washington State,” according to Fish and Wildlife, although GPS data is unavailable for the Colville and Spokane Indian reservations in the heart of wolf territory in Northeast Washington.

Donny Martorello, Fish and Wildlife’s wolf policy adviser, presented the new information at a meeting of the state Fish and Wildlife Commission earlier this month and that presentation can be accessed at tinyurl.com/PDN-WolfInfo.

They show Loup Loup pack wolves, named for the Eastern Washington mountain pass on state Highway 20, moving further north through state and federal land to the Okanogan and Chewuch valleys.

The map also shows the Marblemount wolf, a wolf captured and collared in Western Washington last spring near North Cascades National Park, seemingly enjoys the scenery and hasn’t made much, if any, of a journey since.

One animal really made a trek, leaving Washington north of Spokane, following I-90 as it moves east into western Montana, then heading southwest over Lolo Pass to the Clearwater River. The wolf continued its travels into southern Idaho, making its way near Boise, before crossing all the way to Yellowstone National Park and heading to the middle of Wyoming.

I hope the animal found whatever it was looking for.

Citizen sightings

Citizen-submitted wolf sightings, some with commentary on just what was seen, are available at tinyurl.com/PDN-WolfSightings.

North Olympic Peninsula sightings are few and far between — but there have been some.

In October, a report was made of a wolf on the Shi-Shi Beach Trail.

“One lone adolescent grey wolf observed directly on the Shi Shi Beach Trail from approximately 5 to 10 yards. Gray with white outer fur layer. It spooked into the brush, but remained clearly visible up close for several minutes.”

Many of these “sightings” are large paw prints found in sand on area beaches, like one in 2016 at Adelma Beach near Port Townsend, and another series of prints along the Dungeness River near the Olympic Game Farm.

The only area with multiple sightings, two in total, comes along state Highway 104 between Hood Canal Bridge and the Center Road exit. One of the reports in 2012 was based off of a paw print. Another from last August, describes a witnessed animal as “Large. Dark brown-black. White markings.”

Off the Peninsula, many sightings come from the Seattle-Everett-Tacoma metroplex, some found walking through parking lots at apartment complexes, one in the brush behind the Lake Stevens Target store and one that was “cornered in my driveway on my way to work this morning.”

I tend to think these are all signs of coyotes or cougars but after seeing the winding path that lone wolf took through Washington, Idaho, Montana and back through Idaho to Wyoming, I can’t be sure.

Be careful out there, the wolves may be closing in.

 

Source: OUTDOORS: State’s wolves are on the move | Peninsula Daily News

Comparing costs and benefits of lethal and non-lethal human–wildlife conflict mitigation on livestock farms

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These Wolves would still be alive had WDFW taken action to remove attractants place near their Rendezvous Den Site the first week, rather than waiting over a Month. One would have to question if WDFW left them there to wipe out the entire pack? One would also have to question why Travis Fletcher USFS Grazing Allotment supervisor has not shut down these Grazing Allotments that are known problem allotments. It Appears Travis Fletcher is also blatantly disregarding mandates upon him under the Indian and Public Trust by allowing McIvrin to continue on these Allotments

Reposting Proof for Ranchers, that non-lethal is far less expensive,

Livestock depredation has implications for conservation and agronomy; it can be costly for farmers and can prompt retaliatory killing of carnivores. Lethal control measures are readily available and are reportedly perceived to be cheaper, more practical and more effective than non-lethal methods. However, the costs and efficacy of lethal vs non-lethal approaches have rarely been compared formally. We conducted a 3-year study on 11 South African livestock farms, examining costs and benefits of lethal and non-lethal conflict mitigation methods. Farmers used existing lethal control in the first year and switched to guardian animals (dogs Canis familiaris and alpacas Lama pacos) or livestock protection collars for the following 2 years. During the first year the mean cost of livestock protection was USD 3.30 per head of stock and the mean cost of depredation was USD 20.11 per head of stock. In the first year of non-lethal control the combined implementation and running costs were similar to those of lethal control (USD 3.08 per head). However, the mean cost of depredation decreased by 69.3%, to USD 6.52 per head. In the second year of non-lethal control the running costs (USD 0.43 per head) were significantly lower than in previous years and depredation costs decreased further, to USD 5.49 per head. Our results suggest that non-lethal methods of human–wildlife conflict mitigation can reduce depredation and can be economically advantageous compared to lethal methods of predator control.

McManus, J., Dickman, A., Gaynor, D., Smuts, B., & Macdonald, D. (2015). Dead or alive? Comparing costs and benefits of lethal and non-lethal human–wildlife conflict mitigation on livestock farms. Oryx, 49(4), 687-695. doi:10.1017/S0030605313001610

Source: Dead or alive? Comparing costs and benefits of lethal and non-lethal human–wildlife conflict mitigation on livestock farms | Oryx | Cambridge Core

Oregon Rancher Asks State to Kill Wolves That Attacked Calf

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200 meters is not at the Carcass…. whats the Rancher doing leaving it out for BAIT for a week?? They forgot to mention that the Rancher did or did not use deterrents however…. yet on another BLM grazing allotment

SALEM, Ore. (AP) — A rancher in northeastern Oregon’s Wallowa County has asked state officials to kill wolves from the Harl Butte pack after an investigator confirmed wolves killed a calf.

The Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife tells the Capital Press that it received the request Friday and will decide in the coming days.

A Fish and Wildlife investigator determined the calf of about 450 pounds (204 kilograms) died around July 21 and was mostly consumed by the time it was discovered.

State officials say they found bite marks on the carcass and wolf tracks in the area. A GPS tracking collar also showed a wolf was within 200 yards (183 meters) of the carcass four times from July 21 to July 25.

Fish and Wildlife said it has confirmed six attacks on calves by the Harl Butte pack between July 2016 and July 22, 2017, including a calf killed on a private pasture in April.

On July 21, another calf was found alive with multiple bite marks. That attack and the successful attack both occurred on grazing allotments in public land.

Under Oregon’s wolf management rules, Fish and Wildlife can authorize killing wolves if there are two confirmed livestock killings by wolves in the area or one confirmed killing followed by three attempted attacks, Fish and Wildlife spokeswoman Michelle Dennehy said.

But management rules also include a requirement that the person requesting wolves be killed show that non-lethal protection had been unsuccessful. The person must also show that nothing was done that attracted wolves to livestock.

In Washington state, officials on July 20 authorized killing some members of the Smackout pack after confirming that the animals had repeatedly attacked livestock in Stevens County. One wolf was killed last week, and that removal operations are continuing, the Department of Fish and Wildlife said Thursday.

Source: Oregon Rancher Asks State to Kill Wolves That Attacked Calf | Oregon News | US News

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