Donny Martorellos Weak attempt for an IWC meeting

protect the wolves, donny martorello

Donny Martorellos weak attempt at an IWC Meeting!

Martortello has refused to hold any since 2015. The BIA is not happy with his refusal to communicate! He has only recently contacted them due to constant pointing out his blatant NEGLIGENCE! This will not get him off the HOOK!! They have also not had the agreed upon number of public Meetings this year as well. Martorello is failing miserably and needs to be replaced!

This Agenda is a very weak one to say the least! These Items should have been done YEARS Ago!

AGENDA WHAT: Interagency Wolf Committee

DATE: November 1, 2017 TIME: 9:00 am – 12:00 pm

LOCATION: CONFERENCE CALL

The call in number for the public to listen on a muted line is: 360-407-3780 PIN Code: 274119#

Participant Telephone Dial Pad Commands *0 – Operator Assistance ———————————–

9:00 am: Welcome and Introductions (Stephanie Simek)

9:30 am: Item 1: Update Status of Wolves (Ben Maletzke)

9:45 am: Item 2: Update on WDFW Conflict Prevention (Dan Brinson)

10:00 am: Item 3: Current Policy Issues (Donny Martorello)

10:15 am: Item 4: Background on IAWC (Donny Martorello)

10:30 am: Item 5: Purpose and need for IAWC

 Value in the committee

 Mission statement needed?

 Objectives / goals of the committee

 Frequency of meetings / in-person vs conference call 11:15 am:

Item 6: Updates / Items to share / Needs from other agencies 12:00 pm: Adjourn

WDFW needs reminded it appears, Per Their Own Policy their window is rolling….

profanity peak pack, smackout pack, sherman pack

WE will Speak out for you !

WDFW, you state your window is a “Rolling” Window….

Producer 1 now only has 1 depredation…. Anything Prior to October 3rd can no longer be included in your Count per your own Policy.

Producer #2 does not have a countable depredation now.

Producer #3 has just 1. Further, there were no deterrents present on our first 5 visits after you claimed  a confirmed depredation.  Pull the Ranchers out of your Front Pockets Donny Martorello…..

Update on Washington wolves

Latest reports on key wolf activities, conservation efforts, and management actions.

Weekly update on Smackout Pack August 3, 2017 Producers continue deterrence efforts during Smackout evaluation period Background WDFW’s 2017 Wolf-Livestock Interaction Protocol describes tools and approaches designed to influence pack behavior with the goal of reducing the potential for recurrent livestock depredation while continuing to promote wolf recovery.

On July 20, WDFW notified the public that non-lethal deterrence measures were not achieving that goal in the Smackout pack territory, and that the department’s director had authorized incremental lethal removal of wolves as another tool to address recurrent depredations.

Between July 20 and 30, the department removed two wolves from the Smackout Pack and as of August 3 was continuing to evaluate the impact of the removals on the pack’s behavior. Protocol and management action The department’s approach to incremental removal consists of a period of active operations followed by an evaluation period to determine if those actions changed the pack’s behavior. The protocol states that once a removal operation has begun, the department will update the public weekly on the number of wolves removed. This is the second weekly update related to this management action.

Evaluation The department began the evaluation period on July 31. The duration of this phase is largely dependent on the behavior of the wolves. If depredations continue after the removal period (in other words, a fresh depredation, not one that likely occurred during or before the removal period), the department may initiate another lethal removal action.

No additional wolf depredations have been documented since the depredation on July 22. Continued deterrence efforts The livestock involved in the five Smackout pack depredations documented by WDFW since September 2016 belong to three producers.

Producer 1 – Wolf depredations to livestock occurred on Sept. 21 and 29, 2016, and July 18, 2017, on a federal grazing allotment. The producer continues to:

• Use a range rider, who is on the allotment daily and has a data sharing agreement with the department that enables her to track the movements of collared wolves in the pack. The producer has additional range riders who can fill in as needed. Range riders have firearms and pyrotechnics to haze wolves found near livestock.

• Maintain sanitation in the area. The range rider is removing sick or injured cattle from the range and securing or removing cattle carcasses from areas near livestock.

• Use fladry and other deterrence measures. The cattle are currently enclosed in a fenced pasture surrounded by fladry (a fence with streamers designed to deter wolves).

 

Producer 2 – Wolf depredations to livestock occurred Sept. 28, 2016, on a federal grazing allotment. The producer continues to: • Use a range rider under contract to WDFW, who also has a data sharing agreement.

• Maintain sanitation by removing sick or injured cattle from the range, and by securing or removing cattle carcasses from areas near livestock.

 

Producer 3 – A wolf depredation occurred on July 22, 2017, in a private, fenced pasture near the producer’s residence.

The producer is:

• Using Fox Lights (a type of strobe light designed to deter wolves and other large carnivores) around the pasture where the depredation occurred.

• Continuing to check the cattle daily. July 31, 2017 Second wolf removed in Smackout pack; WDFW evaluating impact on pack’s behavior Background WDFW’s 2017 Wolf-Livestock Interaction Protocol describes tools and approaches designed to influence pack behavior with the goal of reducing the potential for recurrent livestock depredation while continuing to promote wolf recovery.

On July 20, WDFW notified the public that non-lethal deterrence measures were not achieving that goal in the Smackout pack territory, and that the director had authorized incremental lethal removal of wolves as another tool to address recurrent depredations. Protocol and management action The department’s approach to incremental removal consists of a period of active operations followed by an evaluation period to determine if those actions changed the pack’s behavior.

Comparing costs and benefits of lethal and non-lethal human–wildlife conflict mitigation on livestock farms

profanity peak slaughter, protect the wolves

These Wolves would still be alive had WDFW taken action to remove attractants place near their Rendezvous Den Site the first week, rather than waiting over a Month. One would have to question if WDFW left them there to wipe out the entire pack? One would also have to question why Travis Fletcher USFS Grazing Allotment supervisor has not shut down these Grazing Allotments that are known problem allotments. It Appears Travis Fletcher is also blatantly disregarding mandates upon him under the Indian and Public Trust by allowing McIvrin to continue on these Allotments

Reposting Proof for Ranchers, that non-lethal is far less expensive,

Livestock depredation has implications for conservation and agronomy; it can be costly for farmers and can prompt retaliatory killing of carnivores. Lethal control measures are readily available and are reportedly perceived to be cheaper, more practical and more effective than non-lethal methods. However, the costs and efficacy of lethal vs non-lethal approaches have rarely been compared formally. We conducted a 3-year study on 11 South African livestock farms, examining costs and benefits of lethal and non-lethal conflict mitigation methods. Farmers used existing lethal control in the first year and switched to guardian animals (dogs Canis familiaris and alpacas Lama pacos) or livestock protection collars for the following 2 years. During the first year the mean cost of livestock protection was USD 3.30 per head of stock and the mean cost of depredation was USD 20.11 per head of stock. In the first year of non-lethal control the combined implementation and running costs were similar to those of lethal control (USD 3.08 per head). However, the mean cost of depredation decreased by 69.3%, to USD 6.52 per head. In the second year of non-lethal control the running costs (USD 0.43 per head) were significantly lower than in previous years and depredation costs decreased further, to USD 5.49 per head. Our results suggest that non-lethal methods of human–wildlife conflict mitigation can reduce depredation and can be economically advantageous compared to lethal methods of predator control.

McManus, J., Dickman, A., Gaynor, D., Smuts, B., & Macdonald, D. (2015). Dead or alive? Comparing costs and benefits of lethal and non-lethal human–wildlife conflict mitigation on livestock farms. Oryx, 49(4), 687-695. doi:10.1017/S0030605313001610

Source: Dead or alive? Comparing costs and benefits of lethal and non-lethal human–wildlife conflict mitigation on livestock farms | Oryx | Cambridge Core

Cattle Producers of Washington President Scott Nielsen spreading Fertilizer

Profanity peak pack, protect the wolves,

Profanity Peak members that are no longer with us. Credit Dr. Robert Wielgus

Cattle Producers of Washington President Scott Nielsen is a prime example of spreading B.S. stories and fear, just like McIrvrins Letter has earned him a New Moniker by our followers as Pinocchio .

Scott Nielsen said he’s concerned that WDFW’s policy will leave the public unaware of the damage wolves are inflicting on livestock producers. “I would like to see that put out,” he said. No Worries Scott….. we spread your fertilizer everytime we get the opportunity….. Everyone knows your in WDFWs front Pockets….. Perhaps Scott if money is so Important to you stay off our Public Lands…. Clearly you do not care much about your cattle by exposing them year after year to danger in remote mountainous country…..

On the other side…. take a peek at this article….. Cantrell is trying to recover some of his backside after the Public chewed it off after The Profanity Peak Massacre…. No Worries Cantrell….. its not working…. to little to late unless you take aggressive positive action and go out swinging instead of merely ROLLING OVER!!

The Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife reported Thursday that it has killed one wolf in the Smackout pack in Stevens County and that the lethal-control operation is continuing.

WDFW wolf policy coordinator Donny Martorello declined to provide more details about the culling of the pack. It’s the fourth time WDFW has used lethal removal to stop attacks on livestock since wolves begin recolonizing the state a decade ago.

Martorello said that releasing information in the past while operations were still underway has inflamed members of the public, leading to threats against wildlife managers and ranchers.

“Nothing is of higher priority than human safety,” he said.

WDFW announced July 20 that the department’s director, Jim Unsworth, had authorized culling the pack. WDFW verified the pack attacked four cattle over a 10-month period, meeting the threshold for WDFW to consider lethal removal. The department also reported stepped-up efforts to protect cattle with range-riders, strobe lights and fabric flapping in the wind.

WDFW confirmed a fifth depredation July 22. The pack injured a calf that was in a fenced 40-acre pasture that was holding 30 cow-calf pairs, according to WDFW.

WDFW policy calls for shooting one or two wolves and then pausing to see whether the pack stops attacking livestock. Martorello said the lethal-removal operation was ongoing. “We hope we can change wolf behavior,” he said.

WDFW counted eight wolves in the pack at the end of 2016. Since then, according to WDFW, the pack has produced an unknown number of wolves. One female wolf that was attacking cattle was shot and killed by a ranch employee June 30 on U.S. Forest Service land. WDFW said the shooting was lawful.

Martorello declined to say whether the wolf killed by WDFW in the past week was an adult or pup, male or female.

In previous years, WDFW has provided more details.

“An unfortunate consequence for that level of transparency is that it can be used for harassment and threats to public safety,” Martorello said.

Martorello said WDFW eventually will reveal more details, but not until a report in the fall after the grazing season. The department will provide a weekly report on the number of wolves killed, he said.

Cattle Producers of Washington President Scott Nielsen said he’s concerned that WDFW’s policy will leave the public unaware of the damage wolves are inflicting on livestock producers. “I would like to see that put out,” he said.

Nevertheless, the department has reason to be concerned about the reaction to culling a pack, Nielsen said.

“You have some absolute loons who think you should never kill a wolf,” he said. “They (WDFW) need to protect whomever from some of that lunacy.”

WDFW cites a policy developed by the department’s Wolf Advisory Group for its limited release of information.

One member of the group, Defenders of Wildlife Northwest director Shawn Cantrell, has criticized WDFW for not providing more timely updates on wolves, even failing to keep its commitment to provide monthly reports.

Cantrell said WDFW has been slow to release important information about wolf recovery. WDFW, for example, didn’t report until mid-July that a wolf had been hit and killed by a vehicle in March.

“We remain frustrated,” Cantrell said Friday. “We anticipated there would be significantly more transparency.”

The lead on wolf issues for the Center for Biological Diversity, Amaroq Weiss, said the WDFW’s terse report was a “travesty.”

“The public has over and over demanded transparency from this agency, yet the deeply flawed wolf-livestock protocol adopted by the department in June requires only that the public be notified how many wolves it has killed each week,” she said in a written statement.

Washington has 15 wolfpacks clustered in northeast Washington, where conflicts between livestock and wolves have led to WDFW’s four lethal-control operations since 2012.

Nielsen said wolves will continue to attack cattle if they run short of other prey.

“The wolves are hungry,” he said. “They’re hungry and eat or cows.”

Ranchers say verified depredations are only a fraction of the cattle killed or injured by wolves, and that it has become impossible to protect herds with only non-lethal measures.

Source: Washington kills wolf in Smackout pack – Washington – Capital Press

Protect The Wolves

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