New Oregon wolf management plan, which governs killing, delayed after concerns expressed 

protect the wolves, protect oregon wolves, or7

Oregon’s long-awaited update to how the state manages its still-rebounding wolf population will have to wait until February at the earliest.

Fish and Wildlife commissioners decided Friday to push back a scheduled January vote on the five-year governing document for the canid, the first comprehensive update to the wolf plan since 2010.

It wasn’t immediately clear if commissioners would vote on a plan in February, as the agenda already includes an update on the threatened marbled murrelet seabird population.

Wolves were removed from the state’s endangered species list in 2015. The management plan sets rules for how and when wolves can be killed, a hot topic for ranchers in eastern Oregon as the animals continue to rebound after being hunted to near extinction in the 1940s.

Friday’s delay came after more than an hour of testimony from invited panels of environmental groups and hunters and ranchers — where both sides of the bitter fight expressed various concern about the proposed plan.

Environmental groups argued that the plan included inconsistencies about how many confirmed attacks on livestock are needed before an animal can be killed, and opened the door to authorized hunting through a newly created “special permit agent” process where private citizens could carry out approved wolf kills.

Source: New Oregon wolf management plan, which governs killing, delayed after concerns expressed | OregonLive.com

ODFW not allowing Public Comment

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Oregon like Washington, have decided to prevent the comment from the Public. This is not in the Best Interest of the Public’s Resources!

2017

November 30, 2017

Working copy of revisions to the April 2017 Draft Wolf Plan now available

A working copy of the revised Oregon Wolf Conservation and Management Plan is now available online at http://bit.ly/2j1w4nt. This working copy shows the edits staff have made to the April 2017 Draft Wolf Plan as a result of comments from stakeholders, the public and commissioners.

ODFW staff will brief the Fish and Wildlife Commission on this Working Copy of the Draft Wolf Plan at their Dec. 8 meeting in Salem. A panel of representatives from stakeholder groups has also been invited to testify at the meeting, but no other public testimony will be taken on Dec. 8.

ODFW staff will complete additional edits after the December meeting in preparation for adoption and rule-making of a final Draft Wolf Plan scheduled for the Jan. 19, 2018 commission meeting in Salem. Public testimony will be taken at that meeting and can also be provided via email at [email protected].

Source: ODFW Gray Wolves

OSP investigating wolf poaching incident in Wallowa County 

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Wallowa County has joined the late spate of illegal wolf killings. On Nov. 17, the Oregon State Police announced that OR-23, a collared wolf, was found shot in the Chesnimnus Springs area. The wolf was a breeding female and a member of the Shamrock Pack, formerly known as the Chesnimnus pack.

Two wolves in the Klamath Falls area were recently killed, OR-25 and OR-33. The species is listed as endangered in the area. In late October, a hunter also killed a wolf in self-defense in Union County.

OR-23 started as a member of the Ukiah Pack before dispersing to northern Wallowa County sometime in 2014 where it paired with a male wolf. In April 2017, OR-23 was documented as having four surviving pups.

Environmental groups have blamed the killings on recent delisting of wolves in northeastern Oregon, which they say has desensitized the public to the plight of wolves.

“Wolves in Oregon are being gunned down maliciously after wildlife officials prematurely removed state-level protections for these misunderstood animals,” said Amaroq Weiss, West Coast wolf advocate at the Center for Biological Diversity. “Whatever you think of wolves, poaching is wrong and cowardly.”

Oregon State Police is investigating the killing and asking for the public’s help.

“Poaching of fish and wildlife, including wolves, is a problem in Oregon and will be vigorously investigated by the Oregon State Police Fish and Wildlife Division,” said Captain Jeff Samuels.

The ODFW is also asking the public to step up.

“We are upset and frustrated by the unlawful wolf killings in Oregon,” said Doug Cottam, the agency’s Wildlife Division Administrator. “Poaching of any wildlife is wrong and harmful to their conservation. Please, if you know something about any of these cases, step forward and provide information to OSP, which can be done anonymously.”

Source: OSP investigating wolf poaching incident in Wallowa County – Local News – Wallowa County Chieftain

OR23 killed by Poacher near Cold Springs

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November 17, 2017 – News Release from Oregon State Police

OSP SEEKS PUBLIC’S ASSISTANCE IN KILLING OF WOLF – WALLOWA COUNTY

The Oregon State Police is asking for the public’s assistance in locating the individual(s) responsible for shooting and killing a wolf in Wallowa County. The wolf was found dead in the Chesnimnus hunt unit in an area known as Cold Springs on Wednesday November 14, 2017. The wolf was a collared wolf known as OR23 and it is believed that it died Sunday or Monday morning (November 12 or 13).

The Oregon State Police is investigating the incident and has found evidence that the wolf was killed by a gun shot. Due to this being an on-going investigation, no further information will be released at this time. More info.

The Oregon State Police is investigating the incident and has found evidence that the wolf was killed by a gun shot. Due to this being an on-going investigation, no further information will be released at this time.

Poaching (otherwise known as unlawful take) of fish and wildlife, to include wolves, is a problem in Oregon and will be vigorously investigated by the Oregon State Police Fish and Wildlife Division, says Captain Jeff Samuels. As the Division only employs 120 officers statewide, the public’s assistance greatly increases the chances of catching persons involved in poaching.

“We are upset and frustrated by the unlawful wolf killings in Oregon,” said Doug Cottam, ODFW Wildlife Division Administrator. “Poaching of any wildlife is wrong and harmful to their conservation. Please, if you know something about any of these cases, step forward and provide information to OSP, which can be done anonymously.”

Anyone with information is encouraged to contact Sergeant Chris Hawkins at the La Grande Patrol Office, 541-963-7175 ex 4670. Callers can also stay anonymous by calling the Turn In Poachers (TIP) hotline at 1-800-452-7888.

Contact Info:
Captain Bill Fugate
Public Information Officer
Oregon State Police

Media Email: [email protected]

Source: ODFW Gray Wolves

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