Study paid for by Beef Council, tries to gain credibility

protect the wolves

Bob did a good Job at ridiculing the study, but could use some assistance, so we volunteered to educate the Public.

You forgot to mention just how biased the whole “20” minute Results were being paid for by the Oregon Beef Council… to go along with how much Ranchers Love their Cows…. sure do…. all the way to the bank with no remorse on methods of slaughter.
  Ranchers Should be prohibited from owning any more livestock than their own land will support on its Own. That means no imported feed btw. Being the single largest source of destruction to our environment, right behind humans justifies that request…
That study is a sad attempt to once again place a shadow over Our Sacred Species.  Would have been better to have had a Traditional Native American response in there Winking smile Although with all of the corruption, greed and influence coming out of the Cattlemen’s Groups…..  probably wouldn’t have made any difference. Especially these days…. when a Reporter promises to print the real study….. they don’t even come close as evidenced by Our last Interviews in Wyoming.

So right away the Burns-based animals have home-field advantage.

Not to mention the fact that the Idaho-based herd might have been feeling a bit of stress if they thought they would have to spend the rest of their life in the remoteness that is Burns.

“The animals were separated into different pens scented with wolf urine. Wolf howls were piped in over a stereo. Three trained dogs that resemble wolves — two German shepherds and one collie-Alaskan malamute — paced outside the corral during the 20-minute study period.”

Yep, my college professors always told me there’s nothing like a 20-minute study period.

Bob we couldnt help but LOL, they couldnt even bother with a Peer Review like real Studies, Probably because Oregon Beef Council footed the bill

According to Cooke, “The cows from Burns couldn’t care less, but bloodwork from the cows from Idaho showed biomarkers indicating extreme stress.”

Yes Bob, thats because they were just shipped on a truck, thinking it was their last ride!

That’s what 20 minutes in Burns will do to you.

Trust me on this. I’ve been there.

In the decades-long battle between those who love wolves and those who raise cattle, a new study from Oregon State University suggests that cattle that witnessed a wolf attack on their herd never forget the experience.

Which, I suppose, is no surprise. Then again, if cattle worry about their own mortality, they should be more concerned with the folks raising them than with a pack of hungry wolves.

I learned about the innermost fears of cows from reading Andrew Theen’s piece in The Oregonian, one of the few “statewide” newspapers remaining in our country.

Wrote Theen, “Cows whose herd comes under attack by wolves remember the experience and show symptoms similar to post-traumatic stress disorder, Oregon researchers say.”

I’m not sure cows can experience anything even remotely akin to PTSD, but the story did catch my attention.

Theen cites a study by Oregon State professor Reinaldo Cooke that appeared recently in the Journal of Animal Science, which explains why I missed it the first time.

“When wolves attack a herd of cattle, Cooke said in an interview, the surviving animals’ life experience is ‘completely altered’ by the event.

Animals become jumpier around humans and pets, the cows give birth to smaller calves, and the animals are more likely to get sick.”

Full disclosure, Cooke’s study was paid for by the Oregon Beef Council, which was no doubt pleased with its findings.

Noted Cooke, “Those cows are grazing out there, man, and they know what wolves can do. Every time they hear wolves howling, even if it’s two miles away, they go through the stress process. Every time they do that, they don’t eat, they’re always on alert.”

Fair enough, but I suspect that’s a concern best raised with Mother Nature.

“Oregon Wild, a nonprofit environmental advocacy group, criticized the use of PTSD to describe nature. ‘PTSD is a very serious condition afflicting millions of Americans,’ Oregon Wild said in a statement. ‘It is incredibly disrespectful for it to be used by an industry association to make a point that should be obvious to anyone who has ever seen a nature documentary: prey don’t like predators.’ ”

Prey also doesn’t like predators.

What really intrigued me was the “experiment” that was run to justify the conclusion.

“OSU took 10 cows from a commercial herd in Idaho that survived a wolf attack to Burns (Oregon) for the project. They also gathered Burns-based animals that had never seen a wolf.”

So right away the Burns-based animals have home-field advantage.

Not to mention the fact that the Idaho-based herd might have been feeling a bit of stress if they thought they would have to spend the rest of their life in the remoteness that is Burns.

“The animals were separated into different pens scented with wolf urine. Wolf howls were piped in over a stereo. Three trained dogs that resemble wolves — two German shepherds and one collie-Alaskan malamute — paced outside the corral during the 20-minute study period.”

Yep, my college professors always told me there’s nothing like a 20-minute study period.

According to Cooke, “The cows from Burns couldn’t care less, but bloodwork from the cows from Idaho showed biomarkers indicating extreme stress.”

That’s what 20 minutes in Burns will do to you.

Trust me on this. I’ve been there.

Source: Bob Dunning: Even cows feel stressed when they’re threatened

ODFW to Slaughter 4 More Harl Butte Wolves

ODFW following Martorello and refusing to recognize science… ODFW will now authorize additional incremental lethal take of up to four wolves from the pack, which may be killed either by ODFW staff or by  livestock producers affiliated with a local grazing association who will be provided with a limited duration lethal take permit.

Oct. 6, 2017

Update on the lethal take authorizations for Harl Butte, Meacham packs

Harl Butte Pack: Additional lethal take authorized

ODFW confirmed an additional two depredations by the Harl Butte Wolf Pack in the past few days, during investigations on a dead calf on private land on Sept. 29 and an injured calf on private land on Oct. 1.

ODFW will now authorize additional incremental lethal take of up to four wolves from the pack, which may be killed either by ODFW staff or by  livestock producers affiliated with a local grazing association who will be provided with a limited duration lethal take permit. The permit is valid until 10/31/2017 and allows them to kill wolves in pastures on public or private land currently occupied by their livestock.

The Harl Butte pack is currently estimated at nine wolves (six adults and three wolves born this past spring). The younger wolves are likely to weigh between 50-60 pounds by this time of year while adult wolves generally weigh 70-115 pounds. Any wolf in the pack may be taken under the lethal control authorization.

ODFW has removed four adult wolves from the Harl Butte pack since Aug. 3, when it first authorized lethal control after non-lethal measures failed to prevent wolf-livestock depredation. The fourth wolf was killed Aug. 25. “With continued non-lethal measures by the livestock producers throughout the grazing season, we were hoping to see depredations stop after removing four wolves. And six weeks had passed with no depredations since mid-August. Unfortunately, it didn’t last,” said Roblyn Brown, ODFW acting wolf coordinator. “Grazing season is not over and these cattle will be on public land until Oct. 31 and private land even later depending on the weather.”

“As wildlife managers, we are responsible for balancing the conservation of wolves on the landscape with our obligation to manage wolves so that damage to livestock is limited. We need to take further action with this pack,” said Brown.

Livestock producers in the area have continued to use non-lethal preventive measures to limit problems with wolves. These measures include: increased human presence during daytime hours and spending nights outside to protect cattle from wolves; grouped cattle into one pasture instead of several; removed horses from a pasture after ODFW observed a wolf interacting with the horses; and a county and a volunteer range rider have patrolled the area and hazed wolves away from cattle. More info

Meacham Pack: Lethal control expires

The lethal control authorization for a livestock producer with chronic depredation by the Meacham wolf pack on private land ended on Sept. 30. The permit was not renewed because no further depredations have occurred and livestock are mostly removed from the area. While the lethal order authorized the removal of up to two wolves, only one wolf, a female, was killed on Sept. 7 where the previous depredations had occurred.

ODFW initially said this female wolf was a non-breeding female. Upon further detailed examination of the wolf’s remains, ODFW determined that the female wolf had bred this year. More info

Source: ODFW Gray Wolves

WDFW, ODFW prove Wielgus’s Research finds lethal wolf control backfires on livestock

protect the wolves, oppose welfare ranching

Obviously Wolf Project Managers Brown and Martorello have their Heads somewhere that the light doesnt shine to readily….

When will these State Fish and Game Departments wake up to the proof their actions are causing the response?… Groups need to be placed on these State Advisory Boards that do not simply Roll Over…. These States Wa, and Or have Proven Dr. Robert Wielguses Research is in fact accurate beyond a shadow of a doubt.

Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife approved a kill order for two adult wolves from Wallowa County’s Harl Butte pack, which has been responsible for seven confirmed attacks on cattle in the past 13 months.

Ranchers in the area had asked ODFW to kill the entire pack, which numbered 10 at the end of 2016 and at least seven when counted in March. The department decided instead to kill two adults and then evaluate the situation.

“In this chronic situation, lethal control measures are warranted,” acting ODFW wolf coordinator Roblyn Brown said in a prepared statement. “We will use incremental removal to give the remaining wolves the opportunity to change their behavior or move out of the area.”

The wolves will be trapped or shot from the ground or air in the next two weeks, according to an ODFW news release.

The environmental group Oregon Wild opposed the kill request and appealed to Gov. Kate Brown to make sure the decision was made in a transparent manner.

In deciding to kill two wolves, the department determined livestock producers had taken proper non-lethal measures to deter attacks and hadn’t done anything to attract wolves to the livestock, such as leaving bone piles or carcasses.

Ranchers, their employees, a county range rider and a volunteer provided “daily human presence” in the area, ODFW said. One rancher in the area said the pack frequented an area that put them in the middle of several herds grazing by permit on public land.

On seven occasions in June and July, ranchers or the range rider hazed wolves that were chasing or were close to livestock. They chased wolves away by yelling, firing a pistol, shooting at them and riding a horse toward them, according to ODFW.

Ranch hands also spent the night with herds and kept stock dogs in horse trailers at night, as wolves are territorial and might be drawn to attack dogs. Some producers changed grazing practices, such as bunching cow-calf pairs in a herd so they could protect themselves. They also delayed pasture rotations to avoid moving into areas where wolves had recently been, according to ODFW.

Producers removed potential wolf “attractants” such as injured or sick cattle, taking them back to home ranches for treatment. A dead bull’s carcass was removed from an area near a pond where cattle were concentrated, according to ODFW.

The department first received a lethal control request from producers in October 2016 after a fourth confirmed depredation. ODFW turned it down at the time because cattle were being moved out of the grazing allotments. This time, cattle are expected to be grazing on public land until October and on private land until November. Brown, the ODFW acting coordinator, said there is a “substantial risk” livestock attacks would continue or escalate.

Source: ODFW approves killing two Harl Butte pack wolves – Local News –

Questionable Payments To Oregon Ranchers Who Blame Wolves For Missing Cattle 

PLEASE NOTE: There hasn’t been a confirmed wolf kill of livestock in Baker County Oregon since 2012.

Many western states pay livestock operators for cattle and sheep lost to wolves depredation. But an EarthFix investigation found Oregon is making questionable payments to ranchers. Along with Washington State that we found in an earlier Article where they claimed they paid $68,000 for 2 cows if memory serves correctly…..  If Ranchers loved their animals as much as they claimed, they wouldnt subject them to a place where they can get lost or stolen…. and they damn sure wouldnt turn them into a slaughterhouse!

Chad DelCurto parked his pickup beside the road winding the Snake River canyon, surveying the jagged green edge of Oregon where his cattle grazed. This is where he lost them.

There’s ample feed and room to wander on these remote and rugged stretches of public land. But there’s added risk to open range: harsh weather, disease, rustlers, predators.

“This is the reality — this is outside, all natural, grass-fattened beef,” he said.

DelCurto dresses in denim from neck to ankle, with mud-splattered black on his boots and hat. He’s been ranching all his life, and he’s teaching his 9-year-old son to do the same.

Last year, DelCurto claimed he lost 41 calves and 11 cows out here in Baker County. Each calf could be worth over $700, the cows almost twice that.

He blames wolves. Alerts from state wildlife officials showed them in the area. He said the landscape showed some scat and tracks. And he could sense it in his cattle.

“You got up in there and tried to move them, could tell they’d been spooked,” DelCurto said. “I can’t prove it because there’s no carcasses, but I know damn good and well the wolves had a big part in it.”

So DelCurto filed for state-funded compensation for the losses, just as he did for nine missing cattle the year before.

But here’s the issue: There hasn’t been a confirmed wolf kill of livestock in Baker County since 2012. And according to state biologists, there are only three known resident wolves in the county. Given that, a wolf-related loss of that size, with no carcass to show, would be unheard of.

Despite all that, the Baker County wolf compensation board approved DelCurto’s claim. That left one state official with the dilemma of whether to deny the rancher compensation or approve a loosely documented claim so large it would have decimated the state program’s budget.

Ever since wolves’ return in the West, states have experimented with some form of compensation for ranchers, with mixed results.

Since 2012, Oregon has kicked in money for ranchers to hire range riders and purchase radios and fence lining, called fladry, to deter wolves. The state has also compensated livestock operators for both confirmed or unconfirmed losses of cattle, sheep or working dogs. It’s a well-regarded program that provides some relief for ranchers feeling the added strain of a returned predator: even some of the wolf-advocate groups who clash with ranchers say it was necessary.

But an EarthFix examination found the state has made a questionable pattern of payments that contradicts established knowledge of the state’s wolf population.

The investigation also found state and county officials do not take all the necessary steps to confirm claims of missing livestock and ensure a limited money pool flows toward legitimate claims of wolf kills. That can mean less money to prevent wolf conflicts, and less money for documented losses.

With no consistent system for verifying unfound livestock losses, the state has little way of knowing for sure whether it’s denying some ranchers their due compensation or paying out claims it shouldn’t.

No biological explanation

Chart the payments year over year, and a pattern emerges.

Since 2012, payments for missing cattle have increased when actual confirmed losses did not. Experts say those rates should track together.

“There is no possible biological or ecological explanation for this,” said Luigi Boitani, an international expert on wolves who reviewed the data. In 2010, the University of Rome professor uncovered problems with wolf compensation in his home country of Italy.

Source: Questionable Payments To Oregon Ranchers Who Blame Wolves For Missing Cattle . News | OPB

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