Animal rights group, Native Americans to meet in Atascadero to oppose hunting amendment 

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California Fish and Game Commission meets in Atascadero, allowing GPS tracking on hunting dogs is on the agenda

–The California Fish and Game Commission is meeting in Atascadero Oct 11-12. One of the items on the agenda is discussing proposed changes to the California Mammal Hunting Regulations section 265 that governs the use of dogs for pursuing or taking of mammals. The change proposes to allow the use of GPS-equipped dog collars and treeing switches on hunting dogs, a move that is opposed by both animal protection organizations and Native American groups. A tree switch is a device that sends a signal when a dog raises its head to watch or sound a treed animal.

Hunters claim that GPS devices will make it easier to track and find their hunting dogs that are running loose in pursuit of game. Animal rights advocates claim the devices are inhumane both to the hunting dogs and to the animals being pursued.

Randal Massaro, President of Union Members for the Preservation of Wildlife, said that if the GPS collars are approved hunters will have “no incentive to keep up with their dogs in wildlife habitat and terrain when they can sit in vehicles and watch a screen indicating their dogs’ ranging one to seven miles, or more.” Massaro also said the devices violate Fish and Game codes that require dogs be kept under control.

Roger Dobson, President of the Northern California organization Protect the Wolves and member of the Washington Cowlitz Tribe said, “It is inhumane treatment of both the dogs and the wildlife to let dogs run loose where there are real predators that have to eat. No hunter is going to be able to get to any dog fast enough to save that dog from another predator.”

Clifton Aduddel, President of the Native American Church of the Ghost Dancers and a Choctaw located in Southern California said the proposal is a “horrific disrespect of the canines and other animals in general.”

Tony Cerda, Chief of the Coastanoan Rumsen Tribe said he is against turning dogs loose to hunt down prey. “It is our tradition when hunting or even taking plants to offer a prayer to the animal or plant to thank them for feeding my family and to say ‘When I die I’ll feed your family.’ This is the circle of life.”

The commission is meeting Wed–Thur, Oct 11–12 at the SpringHill Suites by Marriott at 900 El Camino Real in Atascadero. The commission’s Tribal Committee also met at 1:30 p.m. Oct 10 at the same location. The commission meeting calendar and agendas can be viewed here.

Massaro said he is encouraging everyone who interested to attend this meeting before the final hearing and vote at the commission’s December meeting in San Diego. Massaro said that he feels both animal rights advocates and tribal speakers at previous meetings about the amendment have not been taken seriously. “It is high time we stop spending our tax dollars to subsidize a cruel sport and form of hunting such as this, not to mention the innocent animals like fawns or other animals that aren’t on the hunting list, maybe even hikers or campers. Getting bit by one dog is bad enough, but getting bit and attacked by six, eight or 12 dogs is even worse,” said Massaro.

Source: Animal rights group, Native Americans to meet in Atascadero to oppose hunting amendment – Paso Robles Daily News

Study paid for by Beef Council, tries to gain credibility

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Bob did a good Job at ridiculing the study, but could use some assistance, so we volunteered to educate the Public.

You forgot to mention just how biased the whole “20” minute Results were being paid for by the Oregon Beef Council… to go along with how much Ranchers Love their Cows…. sure do…. all the way to the bank with no remorse on methods of slaughter.
  Ranchers Should be prohibited from owning any more livestock than their own land will support on its Own. That means no imported feed btw. Being the single largest source of destruction to our environment, right behind humans justifies that request…
That study is a sad attempt to once again place a shadow over Our Sacred Species.  Would have been better to have had a Traditional Native American response in there Winking smile Although with all of the corruption, greed and influence coming out of the Cattlemen’s Groups…..  probably wouldn’t have made any difference. Especially these days…. when a Reporter promises to print the real study….. they don’t even come close as evidenced by Our last Interviews in Wyoming.

So right away the Burns-based animals have home-field advantage.

Not to mention the fact that the Idaho-based herd might have been feeling a bit of stress if they thought they would have to spend the rest of their life in the remoteness that is Burns.

“The animals were separated into different pens scented with wolf urine. Wolf howls were piped in over a stereo. Three trained dogs that resemble wolves — two German shepherds and one collie-Alaskan malamute — paced outside the corral during the 20-minute study period.”

Yep, my college professors always told me there’s nothing like a 20-minute study period.

Bob we couldnt help but LOL, they couldnt even bother with a Peer Review like real Studies, Probably because Oregon Beef Council footed the bill

According to Cooke, “The cows from Burns couldn’t care less, but bloodwork from the cows from Idaho showed biomarkers indicating extreme stress.”

Yes Bob, thats because they were just shipped on a truck, thinking it was their last ride!

That’s what 20 minutes in Burns will do to you.

Trust me on this. I’ve been there.

In the decades-long battle between those who love wolves and those who raise cattle, a new study from Oregon State University suggests that cattle that witnessed a wolf attack on their herd never forget the experience.

Which, I suppose, is no surprise. Then again, if cattle worry about their own mortality, they should be more concerned with the folks raising them than with a pack of hungry wolves.

I learned about the innermost fears of cows from reading Andrew Theen’s piece in The Oregonian, one of the few “statewide” newspapers remaining in our country.

Wrote Theen, “Cows whose herd comes under attack by wolves remember the experience and show symptoms similar to post-traumatic stress disorder, Oregon researchers say.”

I’m not sure cows can experience anything even remotely akin to PTSD, but the story did catch my attention.

Theen cites a study by Oregon State professor Reinaldo Cooke that appeared recently in the Journal of Animal Science, which explains why I missed it the first time.

“When wolves attack a herd of cattle, Cooke said in an interview, the surviving animals’ life experience is ‘completely altered’ by the event.

Animals become jumpier around humans and pets, the cows give birth to smaller calves, and the animals are more likely to get sick.”

Full disclosure, Cooke’s study was paid for by the Oregon Beef Council, which was no doubt pleased with its findings.

Noted Cooke, “Those cows are grazing out there, man, and they know what wolves can do. Every time they hear wolves howling, even if it’s two miles away, they go through the stress process. Every time they do that, they don’t eat, they’re always on alert.”

Fair enough, but I suspect that’s a concern best raised with Mother Nature.

“Oregon Wild, a nonprofit environmental advocacy group, criticized the use of PTSD to describe nature. ‘PTSD is a very serious condition afflicting millions of Americans,’ Oregon Wild said in a statement. ‘It is incredibly disrespectful for it to be used by an industry association to make a point that should be obvious to anyone who has ever seen a nature documentary: prey don’t like predators.’ ”

Prey also doesn’t like predators.

What really intrigued me was the “experiment” that was run to justify the conclusion.

“OSU took 10 cows from a commercial herd in Idaho that survived a wolf attack to Burns (Oregon) for the project. They also gathered Burns-based animals that had never seen a wolf.”

So right away the Burns-based animals have home-field advantage.

Not to mention the fact that the Idaho-based herd might have been feeling a bit of stress if they thought they would have to spend the rest of their life in the remoteness that is Burns.

“The animals were separated into different pens scented with wolf urine. Wolf howls were piped in over a stereo. Three trained dogs that resemble wolves — two German shepherds and one collie-Alaskan malamute — paced outside the corral during the 20-minute study period.”

Yep, my college professors always told me there’s nothing like a 20-minute study period.

According to Cooke, “The cows from Burns couldn’t care less, but bloodwork from the cows from Idaho showed biomarkers indicating extreme stress.”

That’s what 20 minutes in Burns will do to you.

Trust me on this. I’ve been there.

Source: Bob Dunning: Even cows feel stressed when they’re threatened

Wyoming elk and moose population in decline–hunting/Wolves says WGF

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Wyoming elk and moose population in decline–from hunting and Wolves,  Wyoming says, Yet they want to open up a special season for CHILDREN to slaughter Elk on the REFUGE 😉 when its already far under Federal FWS Management objectives.

Hunters in Wyoming, have had Record Slaughters close to 25,000 Elk Slaughtered each year… and yet they make statements like these. You wonder why we do not think that Wyoming is capable of managing out Public Resources?

Like a century-long chess game, the strategic moves and counter moves of managing livestock, wild game and predators on common ground continues.

It’s not simply black against white; there are more than two sides. A multitude of players include state and federal agencies, legislators, ranchers, sportsmen and conservation groups, anti-sportsmen and anti-ranching groups, private citizens and more – all playing with and against each other at times.

Earlier this month in Jackson, Wyo., the Wyoming Game and Fish released numbers on the official annual tally of the Jackson Hole elk herd. Total elk counted were 10,016, with an adjusted total population (not yet released) likely to come in between 10,300 and 10,500. At that range, this year will be the lowest estimated population since 1986. The highest year was in 1991, with 21,200 elk.

Those lower numbers have some groups – particularly those who depend on big game for a living – more than concerned.

And they’re crying wolf. Literally.

“The impact on wildlife from the introduction of wolves in the lower 48 in the late ’90s is undeniable – no matter which way you look at it,” said a representative for Eastmans’ Hunting Journals, a hunting media company based in Powell, Wyo., in a statement provided to TSLN.

“[Hunters and outdoorsmen] understand the importance of wildlife conservation as a generational heirloom to pass down. It’s sportsman that built what we have (had) and the introduction of wolves (and other unregulated predator populations) has nearly decimated that effort in many areas.”

According to Aly Courtemanch, wildlife biologist with the Wyoming Game and Fish’s office in Jackson, the agency acknowledges wolves have had an impact on elk numbers, since elk comprise the majority of the predators’ diet year-round – but they’re not the full story.

“The drop in the Jackson Elk Herd from a high of 21,000 elk in the early 1990s to around 11,000 in recent years has been mostly driven by intentional reduction through hunting seasons,” said Courtemanch.

From 1993 to 2002, when liberal hunting seasons aimed to reduce the herd, the annual harvest was 2,300 to 4,300 elk. “In recent years we have changed hunting seasons to stabilize the herd at objective (which is currently 11,000 and set by the Wyoming Game and Fish with input from community) and harvest has been 1,000 – 1,500 elk annually,” said Courtemanch. “Therefore, wolves certainly remove elk from the population, but hunting season structure has a larger impact on the overall herd numbers.”

Still, it’s not hard to make a different correlation. The drop in big game numbers mirrors the timeline of the introduction of the wolf almost identically. And it’s not just elk disappearing. The moose herd is estimated to be in even more dire straits, with a population of only 400 against an objective of 3,600.

Ryan Benson is president and CEO of BigGame Forever, a sportsmen’s group with the mission of restoring and protecting wildlife populations.

In an article posted on the BigGame Forever blog, Benson said, “Moose in Jackson Hole, Wyo., are in serious trouble. Before wolves were introduced into Yellowstone, there were 3,000 to 5,000 moose in Jackson. Today, less than 20 years after the experimental wolf introduction, there are less than 500 moose left. This is a true American conservation nightmare.”

And in Wyoming, conservation and business go hand in hand – at least in the hunting sense.

In 2015, the total economic contribution of the big game industry was estimated to be $303.5 million. This is according to a study commissioned by the Wyoming Outfitters and Guides Association and produced by Southwick Associates. They also concluded big game hunters generated 3,100 Wyoming jobs in 2015, with 51 percent of those jobs created due to non-resident hunters.

The impact is big, but could be bigger if the wolf were managed and big game populations allowed to thrive. Such is the sentiment among the sportsmen community.

“Much like ranchers that work hard, very hard, to maintain their cattle ranches for their families only to see their profits literally eaten, the economic impact on state game agencies is tremendous too, though most won’t admit it,” said the Eastmans’ representative. “The loss of license dollars is putting additional burden on already cash-strapped agencies. Who wants to hunt where there’s no game?”

Certainly ranchers can empathize with their counterparts in the guiding and outfitting industry on this issue. They too have seen their livelihood stalked down and torn to pieces while they stand by, incapacitated to do anything.

The recovery goal for the wolf, agreed upon at reintroduction in 1995, was 300 wolves and 30 breeding pairs for at least three successive years. That objective was met in 2002, according to the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Services, and recovery has continued to exceed expectation. As of December 31, 2015, there were at least 1,704 wolves in 282 packs (including 95 breeding pairs) in Montana, Idaho and Wyoming. Packs have also expanded into Oregon and Washington.

While ranchers’ interests align more closley with the elk than with the wolves, the elk bring their own issues for domestic livestock. The spread of brucellosis continues to be an issue in the livestock industry. Neighboring states continue to grumble about elk feeding grounds being breeding grounds for disease. The Montana Senate recently passed a joint resolution 50-0 urging federal and state officials in Wyoming to stop feeding elk on winter range. The resolution noted potential loss of wildlife’s natural instincts, environmental damage, and increased probability of disease transmission, including scabies, foot rot, brucellosis and chronic wasting disease, as well as the economic loss due to these diseases.

At the end of the day, the simple facts are elk numbers in the Jackson area are half of what they were in the early 1990s. The moose population has declined to what some people feel warrants them trading places with the wolf on the Endangered Species List.

To some this is ideal. To some, it’s detrimental.

It depends on which chess piece you’re moving

Source: Wyoming elk and moose population in decline–hunting, wolves identified as causes | TSLN.com

Wyoming Wolf Slaughter Trophy Zones continue to attack Yellowstone Park Wolves

protect yellowstone wolves, protect the wolves

POSSIBLE YELLOWSTONE WOLVES ARE DYING

At an Alarming Rate!!!!

AS OF 10/6/2017 at 3pm

We asked for your support back in May to Help Yellowstone Wolves with our Sacred Resource Protection Zone…  Wolves are dying, crying out for us to help them.

Please Consider Joining Our Voice to establish a Sacred Resource Protection Zone Surrounding National Parks in the Blood thirsty state of Wyoming a total of it appears 39 wolves altogether 20 from the Trophy Zone, 19 from the general Slaughter Zone in this Bloodthirsty State!
Please consider becoming a Paid Member so We are able to call these crooked states out in COURT. We have the Research, the tools, the Attorneys, only missing Ingredient is 57,000 plus followers.

Take Back the Power that You as the public hold! Help us to put The Indian and Public Trusts to work Today, before they wipe out the rest of our wolves, grizzlies, wild horses. https://continuetogive.com/protectthewolves

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