Confirmed wolf depredation by Sherman Wolf Pack

Joel Kretz, protect the wolves, sherman pack, profanity peak pack,

The Stories that Donny Martorello and Joel Kretz would have you believe are they dont turn out until June… and 5 Range Riders…. wow… Funny Arron Scotten never mentioned 5… also Joel Kretz claimed originally it was on Private Land…. So to a prudent individual would appear Joel Kretz Blatantly lied to stir the Pot…. He needs to be removes from Office!! Turns out wasn’t Private ground after all huh Joel…. Get your story straight… oh wait you could have simply told the Truth Joel Kretz!

WDFW officials have confirmed that one or more wolves were responsible for the death of a calf whose carcass was discovered on June 12 in a grazing allotment of Ferry County. Investigators also found scattered skeletal remains of a second calf, but they could not determine the cause of its death. The report was made by a WDFW contract range rider who found a recently deceased calf and partial remains of a second calf while patrolling an area that had a cluster of GPS points from a collared wolf from the Sherman Pack.

After finding and reporting the carcass and remains to WDFW, the range rider Arron Scotten remained on the scene to prevent scavenging by wildlife. Shortly after sunrise on Tuesday, June 13, two WDFW officials arrived on the scene. The Department officials who conducted the investigation indicated that the first event was an intact calf carcass with injuries to the groin, inside areas of both the hindquarters and hamstrings. The injuries consisted of bite lacerations and puncture wounds with hemorrhaging associated with those bite wounds. The injuries to calf were consistent with a wolf depredation.

The GPS points from the Sherman Pack collared wolf showed that the wolf had been at the location several times between June 3-11. Data from another collared wolf from the Profanity Peak Pack showed the animal was in the area sporadically from June 5- 7. Based on all available factors, the event was classified as a confirmed wolf depredation by one or more members of the Sherman Pack.

The depredation occurred on BLM grazing lands. It is the first confirmed depredation involving the Sherman Pack. The second calf’s remains were discovered 150 yards downhill from the first calf carcass. Because the scene consisted of only skeletal remains, scattered over a 40-yard area, WDFW classified the event as an Unknown Cause of Death. The livestock producer grazes both private and public lands in the area. The producer’s calves were born outside of occupied wolf range and were trucked into the area for the summer grazing season.

The producer turned the cattle out onto private land on May 24. The producer uses five WDFW contract range riders to increase the level of human presence around the cattle throughout their grazing allotments. The range riders started patrolling the area on May 9, before the cattle were turned out to check for carnivore activity and to proactively increase regular human presence. They have continued to patrol the area with cattle on a near-daily basis, and communicate frequently with the producer. Any changes in cattle behavior or carnivore activity has been shared with WDFW.

The range riders also monitor the activity of GPS collared wolves in the area. There are no known wolf dens or rendezvous sites in the area. Following the depredation investigation, the calf carcass from the confirmed wolf depredation was removed from where high cattle activity is expected. The range riders will continue to patrol the area and surrounding areas.

Wolf researcher plans to sue WSU over free speech | KING5.com

protect washington wolves, protect the wolves

King 5 was emailed the threats of going Old West that Elected Official Joel Kretz made… yet they didnt  ask him about them…..

The Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife is investigating the first livestock death blamed on wolves in this year’s grazing season.

It was found near the historic range of the Profanity Peak pack, which was monitored by a Washington State University researcher, who is now suing over free speech

A range rider found the dead calf in Ferry County near the Lambert Creek area Monday evening. It’s near the Profanity Peak pack’s range, the wolves killed last summer by WDFW after attacking 15 cattle – 10 confirmed and five probable attacks. A female and three pups survived. No one has confirmed what pack is responsible for the most recent death.

The lethal removal further divided the state over wolf management, as protesters rallied in Olympia and cattle ranchers received death threats in the northeast corner where the majority of wolves live.

“I love these cows and I don’t want to feed them to the wolves. I don’t want to see them tortured,” Kathy McKay said. “At least the locals, none of us need them, none of us want them. We’re fine without them. They’re killers. They’re vicious killers.”

McKay’s parents built the K Diamond K Ranch in 1961. Life was good, she said, until wolves migrated back to Washington after nearly a century of being gone.

The Profanity Peak pack killed 30 times more cattle than the majority of wolf packs studied by WSU carnivore expert Dr. Rob Wielgus.

“In particular we noticed that the Profanity Peak pack last year had completely switched to livestock. They were killing a lot of livestock in that particular location,” he said.

Wielgus monitored the pack last year. He found salt licks were attracting cattle near the den site, aggravating the problem. His wildlife camera video of the Colville National Forest shows cattle and wolves crossing paths.

During the study, Wielgus followed wolves and cattle to track wolf depredations, the term used to refer to injuries or deaths attributed to wolves. He found that 99 percent of ranchers in wolf occupied areas in Washington lose one out of a thousand cattle to wolves. The rancher who lost cattle to the Profanity Peak pack had a 3 percent loss rate – 30 times what Wielgus observed.

WDFW authorized the lethal removal of the pack on August 5. The salt blocks were removed August 8, according to WDFW. Wielgus knew about the salt blocks June 27.

“The livestock were still on the den site. We got video monitoring of wolves trying to chase them away from the den site, but the livestock kept returning because of the salt blocks. Then the livestock started being killed by the wolves,” Wielgus said.

Bill McIrvin, the rancher whose cattle were killed in the incidents, was also at the center of controversy over the lethal removal of the Wedge pack in 2014 after losing cattle.

“Last year, during a period of repeated wolf depredations to livestock by the Profanity Peak wolf pack, the Department became aware that the wolf rendezvous site overlapped with part of the normal grazing path, where livestock were concentrated with the use of salt blocks. Once that overlap was detected, the Department contacted the producer, who removed the salt blocks from the area on August 8. Some livestock continued to use the general area where the salt was, so the producer (and family members, staff, and range rider) increased human presence around the livestock to check on and move livestock as needed,” WDFW Wolf Lead Donny Martorello wrote in a statement.

KING 5 also asked WDFW about steps McIrvin took to prevent conflict.

“For Producer #1, the proactive deterrence measures were 1) turned out calves at weights generally over 200 lbs., 2) met expectation for sanitation, and 3) cows birthed calves outside of occupied wolf territories. Also, after the first wolf depredation, the producers agreed to the use of regular human presence (a reactive deterrence measure) for the remainder of the grazing season. This was accomplished by hiring two additional ranch staff, using a range rider, and increasing presence on the grazing site by the producer and family members,” Martorello said.

Wielgus reports the den site was common knowledge. When Wielgus told the Seattle Times what he knew last summer, he couldn’t believe the response.

“I was labeled a liar and a fraud. I was told by my superiors not to talk to the press so I could not tell the full story,” he said.

Rep. Joel Kretz, R-Wauconda, argued that ranchers used the same land as years past and didn’t know they’d put salt near wolves.

“When they salted they had no idea a rendezvous site had moved in. They put it on the same bench they’d put it for 45 damn years. It’s the same place. It’s part of the rotation through the grazing season. You keep your cows moving,” he said.

Martorello said the state is aware of Wielgus’ video.

“The Department has seen the video, reportedly made during the conflict with the Profanity Peak pack in 2016. We were made aware of it by WSU graduate students operating the trail cameras. It did not change Department’s assessment of the situation. The majority of the known wolf packs in Washington overlap livestock, and many overlap active grazing allotments. That is one result of wolves recolonizing of Washington state. However, the fact that livestock and wolves overlap and actively use the same landscape doesn’t necessary mean there will be conflict. In fact, experience in Washington and other western states shows that wolves and livestock coexist without conflict about 80 percent of the time,” Martorello said.

For Kretz, Wielgus did more harm than good, further dividing the state over wolf management.

“We all got tired of the death threats. That’s not the way for a scientist to be operating, I don’t think,” he said.

Kretz told WSU he thinks Wielgus’ science is driven by agenda. WSU reviewed the research but that resulted in no evidence of misconduct. Still, Wielgus believes his job is hanging by a thread.

“I was publicly discredited and defamed by the university. The university said I had lied. I did not lie. I simply reported the facts,” he said.

Wielgus plans to sue for six years salary and then leave his teaching position.

At the same time, he’s publishing research he calls one of the most in-depth wolf studies ever. He found wolf attacks on livestock are extremely uncommon, and that the more humans kill wolves, the more wolves kill cattle the following year. Depredations, he says, typically follow lethal removal of wolves due to disarray in the social dynamics of the apex predators.

“My agenda is scientific truth, and that’s what’s gotten me in trouble in this case. I could’ve just shut up,” Wielgus said.

For Wielgus, the answer is simple: keep cows away from wolf dens. He believes many ranchers are working hard to live beside wolves, but are too afraid to speak out in areas where animosity toward the carnivores continues to mount.

“It’s all about the encounter probability. Predators respond to prey on how frequently they encounter them,” he said.

For Kretz, wolf management isn’t so clear. He’s furious that WDFW did not respond fast enough to the calf found dead Monday. It was called in around 6 p.m., he says, and WDFW responded that there were no conflict specialists available to investigate until Tuesday morning.

“The first incident of the year they can’t get somebody there?” he said. “We can’t trust them to have their act together.”

Kretz worried the evidence would deteriorate, making it more difficult to confirm it as a wolf kill.

“They’re not going to work 24-7. That’s impossible to expect from them,” said Western Wildlife Conservation Director Hank Siepp. “We’re trying to educate people that we have a new critter on the landscape and there will be challenges.”

Washington State University sent a letter to Kretz in regards to his concern over Wielgus. It included the following findings:

“Discussion of the data set and its analysis is continuing among Professor Wielgus, Professor Dasgupta, and other WSU researchers. The University believes the best path forward is continued analysis and discussion of the data within the research community, culminating in submission of articles to scientific journals as appropriate. There is no evidence of research misconduct in this matter. Accordingly, the University has not opened a research misconduct investigation.”

Source: Wolf researcher plans to sue WSU over free speech | KING5.com

Washington Slaughtered 11 of State’s 90 Endangered Gray Wolves 

profanity peak pack, protect washington wolves, protect the wolves, wolves, wolf

Join Protect The Wolves™ Pack today to help be the voice that is working hard to stop actions like this 365 days a year. The Wildlife do not get a Day off… Neither do we!

The 11 wolves, known as the Profanity Peak pack, made up about one-eighth of the gray wolves believed to be roaming the state. Diamond M Ranch is now responsible for costing taxpayers approximately a Quarter of a Million dollars… yes that is $250,000 for the slaughter of 2 packs. Video documented salt blocks near the Profanity Peak Rendezvous Den location., where the salt blocks attracted cattle for more than a Month. Washington State Rep… also a Cattle Rancher Joel Kretz issued demands on WSU to publicly deny statements made by Dr. Robert Wielgus, which at the demands of special Interest cattle Ranchers they did just that. Now almost a year later the truth is finally out with the Video Footage. McIvrin needs to loose his grazing allotment.

Now with a letter by another Rancher also an elected official Donald Dashiell, Washington States Donny Martorello has allowed special interest groups to speed up the slaughter of more wildlife. Martorello needs to be removed from his Job and get an individual in their that takes his mandates under the Public Trust Seriously…. That would also require the removal of James Unsworth, Martorellos supervisor. How long will we the public stand for the mismanagement of our resources? You can help make a Difference by Joining Protect The WOlves™ Pack today….

Source: Washington to Kill 11 of State’s 90 Endangered Gray Wolves for Preying on Cows – NBC News

If Depredations can be reduced near Yellowstone they can be in Washington State as well.

 

protect washington wolves, profanity peak slaughter, protect the wolves

Washington State Ranchers need to dump their typical 1800s old west mentality for a more successful proven way…. Paying for 2 possible kills $65-67,000 needs to stop! Martorello needs to Go or come into modern times where non-lethal is not only more effective, but far less expensive as studies have shown. Martorello also needs to loose the “Special Interest Cattle Ranchers and Trophy Hunting Groups” need to be removed from the Wolf Advisory Group!

Successfully reducing cattle kills

Alongside Range Riders and low stress handling, Hibbard also uses wildlife tracking and flagging to deter predators, like wolves, at his ranch north of Yellowstone National Park. It’s part of the Tom Miner Basin, where a similar situation between wolves, grizzly bears and cattle played out years ago.

Hibbard works cattle alongside fellow rancher and wolf biologist, Hilary Anderson. Over the last two decades, their community has used low stress methods, wildlife tracking, flagging and range riders to bring the number of cattle kills in their region to nearly zero.

“The people who didn’t like wolves before, they still don’t like wolves,” Anderson said. “It’s just that instead of feeling that they were a victim, they’re moving into a place where they do feel support, they do feel they have resources and there’s a sense of empowerment.”

Those methods are also becoming popular in California. But, Hibbard said it’s a total lifestyle change for ranchers.

“They basically have to admit, as I did—and that’s why I resisted it for several years too—was that what ‘geez, i spent more than three decades learning and getting good at, was basically wrong.”

Range Riders are in particularly high demand in Northeast Washington, because that region is home to nearly 85 percent of the state’s wolf population.

But, Scotten said local ranchers are disappointed and dismayed by the potential for a repeat of last summer’s events.

Source: Ranchers, Range Riders Brace For Another Grazing Season Among Wolves | KUOW News and Information

Protect The Wolves

Facebook By Weblizar Powered By Weblizar

Categories

%d bloggers like this: