When farmers don’t bury dead cows, it affects where and what wolves eat | Michigan Radio

protect michigan wolves, protect the wolves, less depredations

 

When farmers don’t bury dead cows It seems to affect where and what wolves eat!

 

Michigan has held one wolf hunt. That was in 2013, when 22 wolves were killed in the Upper Peninsula.

The next year, a federal judge put wolves back on the endangered species list.

Since then, lawmakers from Michigan, as well as Minnesota and Wisconsin, have tried to tack on riders to various bills in Congress that would “de-list” the wolves. These moves are backed by farmers who say wolves are preying on their livestock.

But now, a new study indicates those farmers may be contributing to that predation problem. How? By not burying their dead cows.

Tyler Petroelje led the study and joined Stateside today. He’s from the west side of Michigan and is a doctoral candidate in wildlife biology at Mississippi State University.

Listen to the full interview above, or read highlights below.

On the 1982 Bodies of Dead Animals Act

“In Michigan, it is illegal to have an open pit carcass dump. The carcasses have to be buried underground and if it’s near any wellhead, there’s specific regulations for the lining that has to be within those areas. But one of the problems is that a lot of these livestock owners and operators either don’t know about this or it’s just a generational [thing] where they’re continually using these carcass dumps over and over again.”

On how piles of cow carcasses impact the wolves

“Wolves in areas with cattle carcasses in these livestock carcass dumps tend to reduce their range size as compared to wolves feeding on mostly natural forage.

“…when you have this readily available livestock carcass dump, it’s a much easier prey source and it brings wolves to these areas and they’re spending more time around there. And we see that almost a quarter of their diet was being made up from these livestock carcass dumps when they’re available.”

Do carcass dumps lead to the complaint farmers have – that wolves are preying on livestock?

“This is an issue that we have to look more closely into, because in some areas, such as Oregon, they have recently found that when they remove these livestock carcass dumps, they were able to decrease wolf depredation [attacks] in that area.

“Now, in our study area, we did not actually have any livestock depredation that occurred by our collared wolves while they were feeding on these livestock carcass dumps.

“So this is an important issue we need to take a little bit closer look at. When these carcass dumps are available, are wolves happy with that and then they don’t depredate on the livestock? But if these carcass dumps are depleted, and they’re used to feeding on cattle, does that cause more human-wildlife conflict?

“And that’s an important issue, so we have to realize that if we have these food resources out on the landscape, they can modify wolf behavior, so they’re going to start coming in closer to human establishments and they’re going to start potentially causing human-wildlife conflict.”

According to the DNR, wolf attacks on livestock are down this year. Farmers reported only six attacks on livestock and two on dogs in 2017. That’s compared to 26 total attacks last year and the all-time high, 49 attacks in 2010.

Click here to see a map of wolves’ home ranges in areas with carcass dumps as compared to areas without. Map courtesy of Tyler Petroelje.

Source: When farmers don’t bury dead cows, it affects where and what wolves eat | Michigan Radio

Counting wolves in the Upper Michigan Peninsula  

protect michigan wolves, protect the wolves

Breaking NEWS from Michigan DNR’s Kevin Swanson says Deer Population is way up. 😉

“We have a lot more deer on the landscape now,” says Swanson.

Wildlife specialists will soon be in the woods in Michigan’s Upper Peninsula, tracking wolves.

The Department of Natural Resources last conducted a wolf census in 2016, when it estimated more than 600 wolves prowled in the U.P.

The DNR’s Kevin Swanson says they don’t know what to expect. But he says conditions may be right for an increase in the wolf population.

“We have a lot more deer on the landscape now,” says Swanson.

But Swanson says there are other factors, like canine distemper, that could negatively affect the wolf population.

“It seems our coyote numbers are down significantly in the Upper Peninsula over the last couple years.” says Swanson.

The official estimate of Michigan’s wolf population is not due until sometime in the spring.

Source: Counting wolves in the Upper Peninsula | Michigan Radio

USDA issues report on cattle, Non-predator causes accounted for almost 98% of all deaths in adult cattle and almost 89% of all deaths in calves.

oppose welfare ranching

Surprised? We are not…. Ranchers need to get a reality check and stop Crying WOLF!! When you look at the below numbers and truly think about it. It really shows you how much natural death there is compared  to Predators minuscule amount.

Non-predator causes accounted for almost 98% of all deaths in adult cattle and almost 89% of all deaths in calves.

The U.S. Department of Agriculture’s National Animal Health Monitoring System (NAHMS) has released “Death Loss in U.S. Cattle & Calves Due to Predator & Nonpredator Causes, 2015,” a comprehensive report on producer-reported causes of death in cattle and calves in all 50 states.

Since 1995, NAHMS has teamed with USDA’s National Agricultural Statistics Service (NASS) and Wildlife Services to produce reports on cattle death loss in the U.S. every five years. This report provides analyses of cattle and calves losses in 2015. In addition, death losses by operation type (beef, dairy, mixed and other) are provided, and when possible, losses in 1995, 2000, 2005 and 2010 were included for comparison.

Losses for adult cattle and for calves are reported separately and are categorized as predator and non-predator related. In addition, producer-reported methods used to mitigate losses due to predators and the cost of those methods are reported.

NAHMS provided a few highlights from the 2015 report:

▪ The total U.S. inventory of adult cattle (heavier than 500 lb.) was 78 million head in 2015, and the total calf crop was 34 million head (NASS data).

▪ About one-third of cattle operations had deaths in adult cattle.

▪ About 40% of cattle operations had deaths in calves.

▪ The estimated cost of death loss in cattle and calves in 2015 was $3.87 billion.

▪ Non-predator causes accounted for almost 98% of all deaths in adult cattle and almost 89% of all deaths in calves.

▪ The percentage of calf deaths attributed to predators increased steadily from 3.5% in 1995 to 11.1% in 2015.

▪ Respiratory problems accounted for the highest percentage of deaths in cattle due to non-predator-related causes (23.9%), followed by unknown causes (14.0%) and old age (11.8%).

▪ Respiratory problems also accounted for the highest percentage of deaths in calves due to non-predator-related causes (26.9%).

▪ Coyotes accounted for the highest percentage of cattle deaths due to predators (40.5%) as well as the highest percentage of calf deaths due to predators (53.1%).

Source: USDA issues report on cattle, calf death loss in the U.S.

Western Montana hunters enjoy good elk, whitetail season contrary to their fairytales

It gets old listening to hunters cry that there are no Elk or deer left because of Wolves. They are as bad as ranchers.

Wake Up  Government, it is the Hunters that are decimating the Wildlife not our Native Predators!

Despite uncooperative weather in the final days, the 2017 big game season closed with the highest tallies in four years in Fish, Wildlife & Parks Region 2.

Despite uncooperative weather in the final days, the 2017 big game season closed with the highest tallies in four years in Fish, Wildlife & Parks Region 2.

Montana’s five-week big game hunting season ended Sunday with unseasonably warm winds and patchy snow for tracking. Nevertheless, those who went out in west-central Montana did better than average.

Most of the elk came through the Darby station, where 159 elk amounted to a 14 percent increase over last year. The Bonner station recorded its best success since 2011 with 95 elk. That was also 64 percent better than the 2016 season. Anaconda hunters brought in 46 elk, 59 percent more than last year.

Rebecca Mowry, an FWP wildlife biologist in the Bitterroot Valley, said the numbers here were “pretty average.”

“We had such a strong opening weekend, and then it kind of backed off,” Mowry said. “We need a lot of snow and cold weather to keep the elk moving around, and that didn’t happen.”

Hunters told her they saw elk they couldn’t shoot on private property; a lot of people drove around but didn’t get out of their vehicles; and other hunters reported they shot and missed.

“But there are people who brought out elk they took on public lands,” Mowry said. “For the most part, the harder you hunt the more success you’ll have.”

Deer hunters brought 607 whitetails through check stations at Bonner, Darby and Anaconda. That was 3 percent higher than last year and the highest whitetail count since 2008, according to FWP spokeswoman Vivaca Crowser. All but 100 of those came through the Bonner station.

“We’ve seen a steady climb in whitetail harvest since 2014, which correlates with our sense of a growing population,” said Mike Thompson, FWP Region 2 wildlife manager. “This information is a good check on our thoughts of restoring some antlerless harvest opportunities for the 2018 hunting season.”

Mowry said new regulations in the Bitteroot that only allowed youth hunters to take whitetail does  probably led to fewer successes coming through the game check station in Darby. Only 68 were checked, a steady decrease from 110 taken in 2014.

Mule deer harvest in Region 2 came in 35 percent below last year, with just 77 muleys through all three stations. That’s also the lowest recorded in the past four years. FWP imposed special permit requirements in order to boost mule deer numbers throughout the region.

Overall hunter numbers were down about 8 percent compared to last year. Nevertheless, the 11,115 hunters interviewed during the five weekends of check-station operation tagged 999 animals, which was up 6 percent in 2017 and the best Region 2 success rate in the past four years. FWP game wardens also recorded nine black bears, one moose, three bighorn sheep and two wolves through the Region 2 stations.

None of the wolves passed through the Darby station.

Across the Rocky Mountains, FWP Region 4’s solo check station at Augusta saw normal elk numbers and variable deer success.

“The total elk harvest was 5 percent below the 10-year average,” said Brent Lonner, FWP wildlife biologist. “Similar to other years, the elk harvest this year peaked during the second and third week of the season when snow and cold arrived.”

But mule deer numbers were about 15 percent below the 10-year average. Whitetails were 14 percent above average. All told, the Augusta station recorded 315 elk, 253 mule deer and 341 whitetails.

In northwest Montana’s FWP Region 1, hunter success overall was up to 8.6 percent for 2017, compared to 10.1 percent last year. The six game check stations in the region logged 16,269 hunters.

“The percentage of hunters with white-tailed deer varied greatly depending on where you were hunting,” said Neil Anderson, FWP Region 1 Wildlife Manager. “Overall, hunters seemed to be enjoying themselves despite some challenging conditions. Most of the hunters I spoke to, including those who did not harvest an animal, stated they were having a good and enjoyable season.”

Overall, Region 1 hunters took 1,275 whitetails, 78 elk and 51 mule deer.

 That’s the lowest number of mule deer since records were first kept in 1985, Anderson said.

“We don’t know why the numbers were so low,” Anderson said. “Fortunately, we are initiating a mule deer study in the Fisher River and Whitefish Range in Region 1 this winter. We hope to get valuable information on habitat use, nutrition, and some data on mortality rates.”

Source: Western Montana hunters enjoy good elk, whitetail season | Local News | ravallirepublic.com

Protect The Wolves

Facebook By Weblizar Powered By Weblizar

Twitter Feed

Categories